Explaining is a difficult art. You can explain something so that your reader understands the words; and you can explain something so that the reader feels it in the marrow of his bones. To do the latter, it sometimes isn’t enough to lay the evidence before the reader in a dispassionate way. You have to become an advocate and use the tricks of the advocate’s trade.

Richard Dawkins, The Blind Watchmaker
Posts imported through Keyring Social Importers plugin require setting up the syndicated links manually. The plugin stores the original link data in custom fields. So I’m guessing it might be possible to pull it out and add it to the SynLinks meta box.

https://github.com/dshanske/syndication-links/issues/73

dshanske/syndication-links (GitHub)
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Rating : πŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎπŸ‘πŸΎ

Read/listened to during my commute.

We are not born knowing what to eat; as omnivores it is something we each have to figure out for ourselves. From childhood onward, we learn how big a β€œportion” is and how sweet is too sweet. We learn to enjoy green vegetablesβ€”or not. But how does this education happen? What are the origins of taste?

Eating well is a skill. We learn it. Or not. It’s something we can work on at any age.

In First Bite, award-winning food writer Bee Wilson draws on the latest research from food psychologists, neuroscientists, and nutritionists to reveal that our food habits are shaped by a whole host of factors: family and culture, memory and gender, hunger and love.

We worry about the next five minutes when we should be thinking about the next five years.

The way we learn to eat holds the key to why food has gone so disastrously wrong for so many people. But Wilson also shows that both adults and children have immense potential for learning new, healthy eating habits. An exploration of the extraordinary and surprising origins of our tastes and eating habits, First Bite also shows us how we can change our palates to lead healthier, happier lives.

An interesting discussion by two of my favourite authors on writing and how to tell stories.

Science fiction and fantasy have gone from the sidelines to the mainstream. We bring you a live conversation between two of the field’s living legends, George R.R. Martin (β€œA Song of Ice and Fire,” adapted for television as Game of Thrones, the Wild Card series) and Kim Stanley Robinson (New York 2140, the Mars trilogy), discussing their careers, the history of fantastic literature, and how it shapes our imagination. They came to the Clarke Center in support of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Workshop (clarion.ucsd.edu), the premiere training and proving ground for emerging writers, which the Clarke Center organizes each summer with the Clarion Foundation.

Episode 8: Fantastica, with George R.R. Martin and Kim Stanley Robinson from huffduffer.com