March 28, 2020 – Started Reading
March 29, 2020 – Finished Reading
The Passage by Justin Cronin

IT HAPPENED FAST.
THIRTY-TWO MINUTES FOR ONE WORLD TO DIE, ANOTHER TO BE BORN.

First, the unthinkable: a security breach at a secret U.S. government facility unleashes the monstrous product of a chilling military experiment. Then, the unspeakable: a night of chaos and carnage gives way to sunrise on a nation, and ultimately a world, forever altered. All that remains for the stunned survivors is the long fight ahead and a future ruled by fear–of darkness, of death, of a fate far worse.

As civilization swiftly crumbles into a primal landscape of predators and prey, two people flee in search of sanctuary. FBI agent Brad Wolgast is a good man haunted by what he’s done in the line of duty. Six-year-old orphan Amy Harper Bellafonte is a refugee from the doomed scientific project that has triggered apocalypse. Wolgast is determined to protect her from the horror set loose by her captors, but for Amy, escaping the bloody fallout is only the beginning of a much longer odyssey–spanning miles and decades–toward the time an place where she must finish what should never have begun.

March 11, 2020 – Started Reading
March 22, 2020 – Finished Reading

Absolutely loved this book.

Do Nothing: How to Break Away from Overworking, Overdoing, and Underliving by Celeste Headlee

We work feverishly to make ourselves happy. So why are we so miserable? This manifesto helps us break free of our unhealthy devotion to efficiency and shows us how to reclaim our time and humanity with a little more leisure.

Despite our constant search for new ways to “hack” our bodies and minds for peak performance, human beings are working more instead of less, living harder not smarter, and becoming more lonely and anxious. We strive for the absolute best in every aspect of our lives, ignoring what we do well naturally and reaching for a bar that keeps rising higher and higher. Why do we measure our time in terms of efficiency instead of meaning? Why can’t we just take a break?

In Do Nothing, award-winning journalist Celeste Headlee illuminates a new path ahead, seeking to institute a global shift in our thinking so we can stop sabotaging our well-being, put work aside, and start living instead of doing. As it turns out, we’re searching for external solutions to an internal problem. We won’t find what we’re searching for in punishing diets or productivity apps. Celeste’s strategies will allow you to regain control over your life and break your addiction to false efficiency. You’ll learn how to increase your time perception to determine how your hours are being spent, invest in quality idle time, and focus on end goals instead of mean goals. It’s time to reverse the trend that’s making us all sadder, sicker, and less productive, and return to a way of life that allows us to thrive.

March 21, 2020 – Started Reading and Finished Reading

Good in some places and average in some.

14 by Peter Clines

Padlocked doors. Strange light fixtures. Mutant cockroaches.

There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment.

Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much.

At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbour across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s. Because every room in this old Los Angeles brownstone has a mystery or two. Mysteries that stretch back over a hundred years. Some of them are in plain sight. Some are behind locked doors. And all together these mysteries could mean the end of Nate and his friends.

Or the end of everything…

One of weakest in the series… The thrill just wasn’t there.

March 14, 2020 – Started Reading
March 15, 2020 – Finished Reading

Crooked River by Douglas Preston (book:series=Pendergast)

Before he can return to New York from Miami, Special Agent A.X.L. Pendergast is called to investigate something very strange that has happened on the west coast of Florida. Dozens of human feet, identically clad in blue have washed up on beaches. All exhibit unmistakeable signs of violence. Beyond that, nothing is known about the feet, except that they are fresh and haven’t been in the water long.

Pendergast reluctantly makes his way to the barrier islands off South Florida to investigate a case he believes to be outside his area of expertise and his interest. Once there, he finds the case both disturbing and intriguing, and is drawn into the mystery almost against his will. A preliminary pathology report indicates the feet were chopped, torn, or even wrenched from their bodies in the crudest of ways. Over the next few days, still more continue to wash in, until the number tops one hundred.

Soon the case begins to take a most surprising and complex turn, and Pendergast finds it necessary to call in Special Agent Armstrong Coldmoon for a risky and very specific undercover assignment. And when, at last, the true origin of this awful gift from the sea becomes clear, the former partners are forced to confront an enemy, and a horror, more powerful and deadly than any they have faced before.

An interesting blend of time-travel and epic fantasy. Surely one of the best fantasy works I’ve read recently and most plot threads were tied up neatly and the ending was beautifully done.

Now I’m looking forward to Islington’s next book.

March 1, 2020 – Started Reading
March 10, 2020 – Finished Reading

The Light of All That Falls by James Islington

The Light of All That Falls concludes the epic adventure that began in The Shadow of What Was Lost, the acclaimed fantasy blockbuster from James Islington.

The Boundary is whole once again, but it may be too late.

Banes now stalk Andarra, while in Ilin Illan, the political machinations of a generation come to a head as Wirr’s newfound ability forces his family’s old enemies into action.

Imprisoned and alone in a strange land, Davian is pitted against the remaining Venerate as they work tirelessly to undo Asha’s sacrifice – even as he struggles with what he has learned about the friend he chose to set free.

And Caeden, now facing the consequences of his centuries-old plan, must finally confront its reality – heartbroken at how it began, and devastated by how it must end.

The second book in the Licanius Trilogy was as good as the first one. For a few chapters mid-book, I was wondering if I was still reading the first one. I had forgotten that I was in the second book. Kudos for making it immersive.

February 23, 2020 – Started Reading
March 1, 2020 – Finished Reading

An Echo of Things to Come by James Islington

In the wake of the devastating attack on Ilin Illan, an amnesty has been declared for all Augurs – finally allowing them to emerge from hiding and openly oppose the dark forces massing against Andarra. However as Davian and his new allies hurry north toward the ever-weakening Boundary, fresh horrors along their path suggest that their reprieve may have come far too late.
In the capital, Wirr is forced to contend with assassins and an increasingly hostile Administration as he controversially assumes the mantle of Northwarden, uncovering a mystery that draws into question everything commonly believed about the rebellion his father led twenty years ago. Meanwhile, Asha begins a secret investigation into the disappearance of the Shadows, determined to discover not only where they went but the origin of the Vessels that created them – and, ultimately, a cure.
And with time against him as he races to fulfill the treacherous bargain with the Lyth, Caeden continues to wrestle with the impossibly heavy burdens of his past. Yet as more and more of his memories return, he begins to realise that the motivations of the two sides in this ancient war may not be as clear-cut as they first seemed…

February 19, 2020 – Started Reading
February 23, 2020 – Finished Reading

My sister had recommended this book to me. And it was a bit different take on the usual fantasy trope though the original things that make up a fantasy world were present.

Four protagonists begin their Hero’s Journey.

The Shadow of What Was Lost by http://jamesislington.com/

It has been twenty years since the end of the war. The dictatorial Augursβ€”once thought of almost as godsβ€”were overthrown and wiped out during the conflict, their much-feared powers mysteriously failing them. Those who had ruled under them, men and women with a lesser ability known as the Gift, avoided the Augurs’ fate only by submitting themselves to the rebellion’s Four Tenets. A representation of these laws is now written into the flesh of any who use the Gift, forcing those so marked into absolute obedience.

As a student of the Gifted, Davian suffers the consequences of a war foughtβ€”and lostβ€”before he was born. Despised by most beyond the school walls, he and those around him are all but prisoners as they attempt to learn control of the Gift. Worse, as Davian struggles with his lessons, he knows that there is further to fall if he cannot pass his final tests.

But when Davian discovers he has the ability to wield the forbidden power of the Augurs, he sets into motion a chain of events that will change everything. To the north, an ancient enemy long thought defeated begins to stir. And to the west, a young man whose fate is intertwined with Davian’s wakes up in the forest, covered in blood and with no memory of who he is…

Like Umberto Ecos’ Baudolino, Parker’s unnamed narrator is an unique character who’s both the hero and the villain of this novella. When he says, “I have an idea you aren’t going to like me very much.”, it is absolutely correct. But he turns out to be a lovable rogue like so many of Parker’s other characters in other works.

I absolutely loved the ending which was completely out of the blue but a typical KJ Parker ending.

February 14, 2020 – Started Reading
February 15, 2020 – Finished Reading

BATMAN TALES: ONCE UPON A CRIME (DC)

Featuring four distinct stories including Damian Wayne, Alfred and Batman, Derek Fridolfs and Dustin Nguyen bring together the DC Universe with classic fairytales.

Once upon a crime…

Damian Wayne dreams of becoming a real boy wonder–as long as he can avoid telling lies and making his nose grow.

Batman’s butler takes an unexpected trip through the looking glass and finds himself in a topsy-turvy world, for Alfred’s in Wonderland!

Gotham City Police Department detectives interrogate Gotham’s most dangerous criminals looking for the princess who stole the pea.

And in our final tale, Batman meets a snow queen who leads him on a dangerous quest.

The creative team behind LI’L GOTHAM returns to their Bat-roots, this time with a fairy-tale flair!

Illustrated by Dustin Nguyen is a New York Times best-selling and Eisner Award-winning American comics creator best known for his work on Image Comics’ Descender and Ascender, DC Comics’ BATMAN: LI’L GOTHAM, Scholastic’s DC Comics: Secret Hero Society and many other things Gotham-related.

Written by Derek Fridolfs has been Eisner Award-nominated for co-writing BATMAN: LI’L GOTHAM and is the #1 New York Times best-selling writer of the DC Comics: Secret Hero Society series. In addition, he’s also written and provided art for titles including TEEN TITANS GO!, SCOOBY-DOO, LOONEY TUNES, Adventure Time, Regular Show, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

A story is not like a road to follow … it’s more like a house. You go inside and stay there for a while, wandering back and forth and settling where you like and discovering how the room and corridors relate to each other, how the world outside is altered by being viewed from these windows. And you, the visitor, the reader, are altered as well by being in this enclosed space, whether it is ample and easy or full of crooked turns, or sparsely or opulently furnished. You can go back again and again, and the house, the story, always contains more than you saw the last time. It also has a sturdy sense of itself of being built out of its own necessity, not just to shelter or beguile you.

β€” Alice Munroe, Selected Stories

via: @Adactio

Infovore Β» Not Like A Road To Follow